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Thread: How do we attract new racers?

  1. #1
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    Question How do we attract new racers?

    American Endurance Racing AER
    Champ Car Endurance Racing
    24 Hours of Lemons
    NASA PT, SE30, 944 and SM Classes

    Why are they so successful despite their lack of organization and structure. What did the SCCA (and MCSCC) miss? What happened while we got so comfy?
    Racer of old BMW's.
    MCSCC ITS Class E30 325is
    Racing where IT still exists: http://www.mcscc.org/

  2. #2
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    American Endurance Racing AER - 180TW tires

    Champ Car Endurance Racing - 180TW tires

    24 Hours of Lemons - 190TW tires

    NASA PT, SE30, 944 and SM Classes - Significant penalty for 40TW tires/Toyo spec tires/Toyo spec Tires/Mandated Hoosier tires but the price is significantly subsidized and their contingency is good

    Why are they so successful despite their lack of organization and structure. What did the SCCA (and MCSCC) miss? What happened while we got so comfy?
    <crickets, crickets, crickets, crickets, crickets, crickets...>


    (Probably just coincidence)
    Not my circus...not my monkeys...

  3. #3
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    Agree... that is part of the story isn't it. But it that it? You feel that it's a one dimensional issue? It's not about the run-what-you-brung, easy to understand rules? The bracket-racing? I agree with you on the Spec and PT tire rules completely, but do you think 944, Spec E30, and SM are only successful due to tire rules?
    Racer of old BMW's.
    MCSCC ITS Class E30 325is
    Racing where IT still exists: http://www.mcscc.org/

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by kgobey View Post
    But it that it? You feel that it's a one dimensional issue?
    Absolutely not. But I think the cost aspect - or even the impression of a cost aspect - certainly can be a significant factor.
    Not my circus...not my monkeys...

  5. #5
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    Yeah that's it exactly. The notion that "I can be guaranteed a level playing field", combined with the notion that the rules are super easy for a lay-person to understand and build to and a simple formula for legitimacy in licensing are what drives them to these other series.

    We can never compete on outright track time, but we can compete on ease of use. But how... ?
    Racer of old BMW's.
    MCSCC ITS Class E30 325is
    Racing where IT still exists: http://www.mcscc.org/

  6. #6

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    Brand identity definitely seems to be part of the problem. The very popular classes can be (and are) described in a succinct, attractive way.

    If someone asked me to describe Improved Touring racing, I'm not confident that I can give them a short, interesting elevator speech.
    Roger Maeda - #7 ITS Honda Prelude Si
    South Jersey Region

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by boxedfox View Post
    If someone asked me to describe Improved Touring racing, I'm not confident that I can give them a short, interesting elevator speech.
    Very good point.
    Not my circus...not my monkeys...

  8. #8
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    I've only done LeMons and it was great!

    Some of the most interesting cars ever seen on track. Think spreedycop or 5 cylinder radial aircraft engine, etc.

    No license but for $$ so some team members that had never raced joined. One now has a SCCA license.

    Team environment so that was fun. And some just tried it and said enough and bailed and do track days.

    I don't think the typical SCCA racer really exists any more. Most younger folks think something looks interesting and try it and then decide something else looks interesting and moves on.

    Sticking with the same car or class for years or decades is not the way of the world any more.

    Not good or bad, just different.
    1985 CRX Si competed in Solo II: AS, CS, DS, GS
    1986 CRX Si competed in: SCCA Solo II CSP, SCCA ITA, SCCA ITB, NASA H5
    1988 CRX Si competed in ITA & STL

  9. #9
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    I like both of these points. It's about branding and about the notion of "fun" and the whole team aspect of cheap racing means a lot. I do love the low effort required of participation, but I think you're right, we don't have that, the SCCA is more structured than that (which I personally appreciate)

    What if the SCCA (maybe as part of this 200TW effort) at a national level introduced the ITLB classes, IT Low-Buck (1,2,3 etc.) and bracket cars built for Low-Buck endurance series like they do at champ, lemons etc. ?
    Racer of old BMW's.
    MCSCC ITS Class E30 325is
    Racing where IT still exists: http://www.mcscc.org/

  10. #10
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    SCCA has had ITEZ and Bracket Enduro and very few showed up.

    I do not think street tires are the answer.

    Not sure what is but I think it is closer to Track Night in America than putting street tires on IT cars.
    1985 CRX Si competed in Solo II: AS, CS, DS, GS
    1986 CRX Si competed in: SCCA Solo II CSP, SCCA ITA, SCCA ITB, NASA H5
    1988 CRX Si competed in ITA & STL

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