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Thread: The GCR and You

  1. #21
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    How do we set up a bump draft without driver hand signals?
    Chris Schaafsma
    Golf 2 HProd

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  2. #22

    Default Part 5 - Mechanical Protests

    (Part 5 in the series, 'Your Friend, the GCR')

    Part 5 - Mechanical Protests

    Here is an FAQ around mechanical protests. Mechanicals are sort of obscure, partly because the process is seen as being very complex, and partly because they can entail a large bond. Thus, drivers tend to stay away from them. Actually, from the driver's point of view, the process is fairly straightforward.

    1. Who can protest, and what can be protested?

    Only drivers and entrants may file a mechanical protest [8.3.3]. An official cannot. However, the Chief Steward can order a teardown without receiving a protest, and this process is essentially the same as a protest, with the organizing Region responsible for the bond [5.12.2.C.5].

    You can protest any component of a car which is defined in the class rules or spec lines. A protest must specify "... which sections of the GCR or other applicable rules are alleged to have been violated ..." [8.3.2].


    2. How do I file a protest?

    Fill in a standard SCCA protest form (available from the Chief Steward or downloadable from scca.com).

    Specify in detail which rules and/or spec lines have been violated. Deliver the protest and protest fee to the Chief Steward, or an Assistant Chief Steward, within the protest time window. A mechanical must be filed "... no later than one hour before the start of the race ..." [8.3.2.B.1]. The Chief Steward must transmit the protest to the SOM. The SOM may relax the time limit in exceptional cases.

    The Chairman of the SOM may ask you to clarify your protest or to make it more specific. The Chairman's objective in doing this is to make very clear what is at issue, and how it will be measured, with reference to the relevant rule and/or shop manual.


    3. Why can't I just mention my suspicions to Tech, and have them take care of it?

    Well, they are your suspicions, aren't they? You should be willing to back them up.

    The GCR makes it clear that enforcing the rules is a joint responsibility among the officials and the entrants/drivers. If you believe that a competitor's car is non-compliant, the GCR provides you a means to test that belief.


    4. Why post a bond, and why is it so large?

    Depending on the component(s) protested, inspection may require disassembly of the car. The disassembly, inspection, and reassembly (i.e. to restore the car to pre-inspection state) may entail considerable work, third-party expense (for shipping, inspection services etc.), and consumables. These all cost something. The bond is intended to cover this cost, and the process determines whether the protestor or protestee must bear the cost.

    The size of the bond will vary according to the expense entailed in resolving the protest. So, verifying an engine casting number or shock absorber model number may require no bond, but verifying camshafts may require a considerable bond.

    The SOM will establish the bond, after consulting with the protestor, the protestee, the Chief of Tech, and any experts deemed useful. In addition, the SOM will determine the local prevailing shop rate, and will consult the SCCA Labor Rate Guide for standard times for common actions. The protestor must post the established bond, in cash or by check. The protestee may be required to sign a repair order if some of the work is to be done by a commercial shop.

    SCCA Club Racing offers a verification service for protested components. It requires a complete description of the car/engine and a known stock example of the part in question. The cost of the inspection is set according to the SCCA Labor Rate Guide.

    For a lengthy list of inspections (e.g. requiring complete disassembly of the engine), the protestor and SOM may collect the various items into logical groups and assign a portion of the bond to each group. The inspections would then be done in order by group.

    The difficult part of this process is ensuring that the protest, as written, can be resolved according to the class/car rules, and establishing the correct bond. Both these often require discussions with the protestor and protestee.


    5. Why require a bond at all?

    This is a philosophical question, and may have no 'right' answer.

    The answer that we have chosen in SCCA is that an inspection can entail significant costs, which must be covered by someone. It is fair that the losing party cover the costs.

    As a practical matter, requiring a bond discourages frivolous or malicious protests, which can be a major inconvenience for the protestee. By having to 'put your money where your mouth is', the protestor is required to have something at stake.


    6. How does the teardown/inspection work?

    Once the SOM accept a mechanical protest, their first step is to take custody of the protested car. This doesn't necessarily mean pulling it into the Tech shed. It does mean assigning a custodian (a member of the SOM or a Tech person) to watch the car, and to preserve the integrity of the protested component(s). The crew can work on the car, and the team race it; they just can't work on the protested component(s).

    The SOM will select a technician to perform the inspection, often a member of the Tech team. The Chairman will consult the protestor and protestee during the selection process, and attempt to find a candidate acceptable to all parties.

    Once the bond is posted, the inspection begins. Refusal to allow inspection of a protested car will attract an immediate automatic penalty [8.3.3.C, 7.4.E].

    If the car is found compliant, the protestor forfeits the bond.

    If a component fails a measurement, the team will repeat the measurement in the presence of the protestee. The protestee will be asked for an explanation of the failed measurement.

    If the inspection reveals non-compliant parts not specified in the protest, the protest is not affected. The non-compliant parts are referred to the Chief Steward, who will act on them as if they were found in a normal post-race inspection.

    If the inspection (and bond) has been segmented into logical groupings, the protestor has the option of halting the inspection at the completion of each group.

    Obviously, if the inspection requires shipping parts off-site for measurement, the inspection process will continue past the end of the weekend. Events still unfold in the same order, though.


    7. What happens next?

    The SOM will hold a standard hearing. The protestor and protestee will be heard, and can produce witnesses and evidence. "In the event a car is found in non-compliance, a claim that the non-compliant item(s) offer no performance advantage shall have no influence on any ruling." [8.3.3] If the court finds the car non-compliant, it can assign the normal penalties, subject to appeal. In addition, the court will order logbook entries related to the non-compliant parts discovered.

    The bond is sent to the Manager of Club Racing for distribution after the end of the appeals period. All evidence and testimony is sent to Topeka, in case of appeal. Non-compliant parts are impounded in the custody of the Chairman, pending appeal.



    So, a mechanical protest follows much the same process flow as a protest against a person, with some added steps necessary to deal with manipulating cars and components. The underlying principle is the same: to provide an impartial forum in which to resolve disagreements and to enforce rules, with a set process, and a means of appealing the decision taken at the track.
    Last edited by Greg Amy; 08-18-2009 at 10:25 AM.

  3. #23
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    John,

    These are great posts. Very informative!!


    A couple of suggestions for a protester (coming from experience):

    - Get a group together to spread the financial impact
    - Protest EVERYTHING (if you're looking at the engine). Not to be a pain, but if you think it might be a cam, protest the pistons, the head, etc. You may have been wrong on where you thought the power was coming from so there's a better chance of getting a positive outcome. You only need one item deemed illegal to win the protest, not all of them.
    - Don't be surprised if you get a little push back from the stewards for filing. It is a BIG PIA for them.




    Has anyone seen a steward order a tear down without receiving a protest?

    .
    Jeff L

    ITA Miata



    2010 NARRC Champion

    2007 NERRC Championship, 2nd place
    2008 NARRC Championship, 2nd place
    2009 NARRC Championship, 2nd place

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by JLawton View Post



    Has anyone seen a steward order a tear down without receiving a protest?

    .
    Is this even within thier scope?
    Andy Bettencourt
    New England Region 188967

  5. #25
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    Well there was this time a couple of years ago in So Cal with Miatas having headsshipped to Topeka but it almost started a congressional investigation. Any steward who knows the story would likely not make the same mistakes.
    dick patullo
    ner scca IT7 Rx7

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Bettencourt View Post
    Is this even within thier scope?
    Yes. But by doing so the Region would be liable for any expense(s) of the tear-down if the car were found legal.

    There are special cases, such as the Runoffs and the ARRC, where it is specified in the supps that cars will be torn down at the competitors' own expense, but they are rare. This is why most post-race inspections ordered by the Tech Steward are purely of a non-destructive nature (e.g., weighing, open hoods, track, wheel width, boroscope, Whistler, etc).

    Best to accept that if you want to see the inside of a competitor's engine, yer gonna have ta crack open your wallet. - GA
    Not my circus...not my monkeys...

  7. #27
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    It would be cool if someone that had the ability made these threads sticky somewhere. They, and the ensuing discussions are a nice resource.
    Chris Schaafsma
    Golf 2 HProd

    AMT Racing Engines - DIYAutoTune.com

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by shwah View Post
    It would be cool if someone that had the ability made these threads sticky somewhere. They, and the ensuing discussions are a nice resource.
    Good idea.

    Poof.
    Not my circus...not my monkeys...

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Amy View Post
    Best to accept that if you want to see the inside of a competitor's engine, yer gonna have ta crack open your wallet.

    Even if you crack open that wallet...and the motor does get opened...you're not likely to see it or get any useful info, other a "compliant" or a "not compliant" verdict.

    You can use a teardown as a fishing expedition, but you will not be allowed to eat the fish.

  10. #30

    Default Part 6 - Your Car and Equipment

    (Part 6 of 'You and the GCR'. With thanks to John Haydon for suggesting the topic.)

    Part 6 - Your Car and Equipment

    The GCR contains over 400 pages of rules and specs for cars and equipment, and there is no point in regurgitating them here. Instead, this is a highly-selective list of items from 9.2/9.3 which have tripped people up at annual tech or at the track.


    Documentation

    Your car's logbook requires photographs of the car, and should record changes of ownership (i.e. you should be listed as the current owner) [9.2.1.C].

    If your car is subject to homologation (formula and sports racers registered after 1983), remember that it is homologated by class. If you choose to convert it to another class (e.g. FC to F, it must be homologated into the new class, following the rules in the current GCR, not the year of original manufacture [9.2.2].


    Flying Objects
    Are the following items fastened securely: ballast [9.3.8], batteries [9.3.9], body panels [9.3.10], cameras [9.3.12]?


    Fire Safety
    Review 9.3.22. You can't test-fire the fire system, but are the lines and nozzles clean, clear, not rusted? Do you have holes in the firewall or floor? "Firewall and floor shall prevent the passage of flame and debris into the driver’s compartment." [9.3.23]


    Roll Cage
    We still encounter cars which do not have the current standard side tubes installed. "Two side tubes connecting the front and main hoops across both door openings are mandatory." [9.4.D] Remember that we no longer give waivers on safety items.


    Driver Safety Gear

    "Arm restraints shall not be worn in a manner which limits the ability of the driver to provide visible signals to other competitors while on track" [9.3.18]

    Belts must meet SFI (16.1 or 16.5) or FIA (8853/98 8854/98) specifications [9.3.18.G]. SFI belts expire at the end of the second year following manufacture (e.g. a belt manufactured anytime in 2009 expires at the end of 2011). FIA belts carry their expiration date on the belt.

    Driver safety equipment is required to be "... in good condition and free of defects, holes, cracks, frays etc." [9.3.19.C]

    For helmets, SCCA permits the two most recent Snell certifications, and drops the older one when a new certification is released. The oldest Snell certification permitted by the 2009 GCR is SA2000. When the next standard is released (probably SA2010), the oldest permitted standard will be SA2005, if past practice is a guide.

    The driver's uniform "... shall display the official SCCA uniform patch logo ...", SCCA item #3619 or #3637 [9.3.28.C].


    Bodywork

    It's worth quoting GCR 9.3.6 in full:

    "Appearance neat and clean, and suitable for competition. Specifically,
    cars that are dirty either externally or in the engine or passenger compartments,
    or that show bodywork damage, structural or surface rust, or that
    are partially or totally in primer, or that do not bear the prescribed identification
    marks shall not be approved for competition."

    Simply put, your car must be structurally sound, clean, with bodywork and paint in undamaged (not necessarily showroom) condition, and carrying specified decals in specified locations.

    Many (most?) Tech folks will let smaller bodywork issues slide during the year, but make logbook notations at the last race of the season, directing bodywork repairs before the first race of the next season.


    Graphics, Decals and Numbers

    Graphics are permitted "... provided they are in good taste and do not interfere with identification marks and SCCA logos." [9.3.3] In addition, "Logos and decals of sanctioning bodies other than SCCA shall be removed or covered (car and driver’s suit)." [9.3.28.C]

    The following items are required:

    Fire System. A circle 'E' decal, SCCA item #2607. See 9.3.22.A.3.a/b for specific location required for types of cars.

    Master Switch. A spark in a blue triangle, SCCA item #2606. See 9.3.33.A/B/C for specific location required for types of cars.

    SCCA Logo. SCCA field logo, SCCA item #2608. They shall be displayed "... unobstructed and prominently on both sides of the car and adjacent to the side numbers. A third logo shall be displayed on the front of the car unobstructed and prominently near the front number. The logo shall be on the spoiler of cars so equipped." [9.3.28.C]

    Numbers and Class Identification. These "... shall meet the approval of the Chief of Timing and Scoring." [9.3.28.A] If the folks in T&S cannot read your numbers you will be asked (told) to make them more visible. "Numbers shall be at least eight (8) inches high, with a 1.5 inch stroke on a contrasting backgound. ... The distance between two (2) numbers shall be at least as wide as the stroke of the numbers." [9.3.28.B]
    Last edited by Greg Amy; 08-18-2009 at 10:27 AM.

  11. #31
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    On the roll cages section, I'd also add that all welds must be 360 degrees around the tube and no grinding of any welds allowed. Both of those are often overlooked.

    A few weeks ago, I teched an SCCA logbooked ITB car for NASA and the welds that were there were ground down and bondo'd over.
    Scott Rhea
    Izzy's Custom Cages
    It's not what you build... It's how you build it
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    Neon Racing Springs

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speed Raycer View Post
    On the roll cages section, I'd also add that all welds must be 360 degrees around the tube and no grinding of any welds allowed. Both of those are often overlooked.
    I've heard that the tech inspectors pay specific attention to this. I looked for this requirement in the 2009 GCR, but could not find it in the rollcage section that I thought pertains to IT cars.

    IT cars follow section 9.4 Roll Cages for GT and Production Based Cars, and not section 9.4.5 Roll Cages for Formula Cars and Sports Racers, right? Under section 9.4 I can't find this requirement. But under section 9.4.5 I find the following:
    9.4.5.E.6.
    ...Welds shall be continuous around the entire tubular structure.
    The reason I was looking is because as everyone is well aware, it is extremely difficult to weld all the way around certain joints, and I wanted to know if there was an allowance where gussets might preclude full circumferential welding. So where exactly is this requirement that sometimes catches some people?

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speed Raycer View Post
    On the roll cages section, I'd also add that all welds must be 360 degrees around the tube and no grinding of any welds allowed. Both of those are often overlooked.
    That would be good practice, but where is it required in the rules?

    See 9.4.G.4:
    It is recommended that all joints of the roll cage be welded. All welding must include full penetration, no cold lap, no surface porosity, no crater porosity, no cracks, no whiskers, and so forth. Alloy steel must be normalized after welding. It is recom-mended that a certified AWS D1.1 welder do all welding.

  14. #34
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    9.4.5.E.6. (I think... I suck at following that BS) I'll have to dig for the AWS code, but can guarantee that it's against the code to grind a weld, but for now, this'll have to do:

    6. Welding shall conform to American Welding Society D1.1:2002, Structural Welding Code, Steel Chapter 10, Tubular Structures. Whenever D1.1 refers to "the Engineer" this shall be inter-preted to be the owner of the vehicle. Welds shall be contin-uous around the entire tubular structure. All welds shall be visually inspected and shall be acceptable if the following conditions are satisfied: a. The weld shall have no cracks. b. Thorough fusion shall exist between weld metal and base metal. c. All craters shall be filled to the cross section of the weld. d. Undercut shall be no more than 0.01 inch deep.

    Scott Rhea
    Izzy's Custom Cages
    It's not what you build... It's how you build it
    Performance Driven LLC
    Neon Racing Springs

  15. #35
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    Scott, the other guys were pointing out that the section you quoted is under the rules for formula & sport racers cars. The rules for production and GT cars don't include that same stipulation. It looks like maybe it got lost when the new roll cage rules were written, as the stipulation IS included under "Basic Design Considerations" in the "Appendix G - 2007 Roll Cage Rules" section.
    Earl R.
    240SX
    ITA/ST5

  16. #36
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    Thanks Earl. I knew I hadn't dreamt it up My version of Acrobat is corrupt so I was happy to be able to find what I did.

    Seriously, they need to fix what they tried to fix. They left out some important stuff.
    Scott Rhea
    Izzy's Custom Cages
    It's not what you build... It's how you build it
    Performance Driven LLC
    Neon Racing Springs

  17. #37

    Default Epilogue - First Principles

    (Last episode in the series 'You and the GCR')

    Epilogue - First Principles

    Perhaps the worst plight of a vessel is to be caught in a gale on a lee shore. In this connection the following ... rules should be observed:

    1. Never allow your vessel to be found in such a predicament.

    LF Callingham: Seamanship: Jottings for the Young Sailor

    For this last posting in the series, I depart from my earlier practice. Till now, we have basically been discussing what happens when something goes wrong. You have doubtless already guessed that everything in these posts came from incidents I observed at the track this year.

    In this piece, I want instead to discuss those things you can do to prevent unhappy outcomes.

    Based on all I have seen this year, I offer the following first principles. If you follow them, you will be much less likely to have problems in your racing.

    1. Maintain situational awareness. Keep your eyes moving at all times. Check your mirrors. Check the flag stations. Be aware of other cars around you, and how they are moving with respect to yours. Be aware of cars coming up on you.

    2. Save some bandwidth. If you are spending your entire mental budget on simply lapping at some speed, you won't have any brain power left over to deal with emergencies or unusual situations. I have interviewed drivers coming off track whose eyes were quite glazed over. They had overloaded their ability to process information.

    3. Be predictable, especially in mixed-class race groups. Hold your line. Don't suddenly change your line, thinking that it will allow faster cars to pass. They saw you before you saw them, and they most likely made a plan based on your trajectory. Don't surprise them.

    4. Make a plan. Be ready for the unexpected or unusual. What will you do if the car in front spins after you have committed to a turn? What if you lose oil pressure? Are you even checking the oil pressure? In the moment, it will be too late to think about what to do. It's better to have thought scenarios through in advance, and to be ready.

    5. Obey the Rules of the Road. Read section 6.8.1 of the GCR (or page 12 of the Portable Driver's Advisor). The rules for on-course conduct are really quite simple. They boil down to seven words: 'No Contact', 'No Blocking', and 'Leave Racing Room'. Please remember that 'incidental contact' does not exist anywhere in the rules.

    6. In a spin? Both feet in. I continue to be amazed at how many drivers forget this simple rule from drivers school. Almost every month, I see a collision caused by a driver failing to keep the brakes on when spinning, reaching the top of some slope, and then rolling back into traffic.

    7. Do you have an exit strategy? Practice getting out of your racecar with your eyes closed. If it catches fire, you will have a short time in which to get out and possibly little visibility. Can you get out in 6 or 7 seconds? After you crash, it will be too late to practice. Also, did you arm your fire system before going on track? Make that part of your pre-session checklist.

    8. Work on your decision-making skills. I see a wide variety of bad outcomes. Yet virtually all of them fit in the bucket labeled 'Poor Choices'. Ask yourself, does the gain justify the risk in making this move? Can I achieve the same result by waiting till the next turn or the next lap, or by taking a different approach? Is this really a good idea? So often, I see incidents which have everyone asking, "What was he thinking?"


    I hope this series has been interesting and informative. I'll look forward to seeing you at the track.
    Last edited by Greg Amy; 08-18-2009 at 10:28 AM.

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Nesbitt View Post
    (Last episode in the series 'You and the GCR')


    Perhaps the worst plight of a vessel is to be caught in a gale on a lee shore. In this connection the following ... rules should be observed:

    1. Never allow your vessel to be found in such a predicament.

    LF Callingham: Seamanship: Jottings for the Young Sailor

    For this last posting in the series, I depart from my earlier practice. Till now, we have basically been discussing what happens when something goes wrong. You have doubtless already guessed that everything in these posts came from incidents I observed at the track this year.

    In this piece, I want instead to discuss those things you can do to prevent unhappy outcomes.

    Based on all I have seen this year, I offer the following first principles. If you follow them, you will be much less likely to have problems in your racing.

    1. Maintain situational awareness. Keep your eyes moving at all times. Check your mirrors. Check the flag stations. Be aware of other cars around you, and how they are moving with respect to yours. Be aware of cars coming up on you.

    2. Save some bandwidth. If you are spending your entire mental budget on simply lapping at some speed, you won't have any brain power left over to deal with emergencies or unusual situations. I have interviewed drivers coming off track whose eyes were quite glazed over. They had overloaded their ability to process information.

    3. Be predictable, especially in mixed-class race groups. Hold your line. Don't suddenly change your line, thinking that it will allow faster cars to pass. They saw you before you saw them, and they most likely made a plan based on your trajectory. Don't surprise them.

    4. Make a plan. Be ready for the unexpected or unusual. What will you do if the car in front spins after you have committed to a turn? What if you lose oil pressure? Are you even checking the oil pressure? In the moment, it will be too late to think about what to do. It's better to have thought scenarios through in advance, and to be ready.

    5. Obey the Rules of the Road. Read section 6.8.1 of the GCR (or page 12 of the Portable Driver's Advisor). The rules for on-course conduct are really quite simple. They boil down to seven words: 'No Contact', 'No Blocking', and 'Leave Racing Room'. Please remember that 'incidental contact' does not exist anywhere in the rules.

    6. In a spin? Both feet in. I continue to be amazed at how many drivers forget this simple rule from drivers school. Almost every month, I see a collision caused by a driver failing to keep the brakes on when spinning, reaching the top of some slope, and then rolling back into traffic.

    7. Do you have an exit strategy? Practice getting out of your racecar with your eyes closed. If it catches fire, you will have a short time in which to get out and possibly little visibility. Can you get out in 6 or 7 seconds? After you crash, it will be too late to practice. Also, did you arm your fire system before going on track? Make that part of your pre-session checklist.

    8. Work on your decision-making skills. I see a wide variety of bad outcomes. Yet virtually all of them fit in the bucket labeled 'Poor Choices'. Ask yourself, does the gain justify the risk in making this move? Can I achieve the same result by waiting till the next turn or the next lap, or by taking a different approach? Is this really a good idea? So often, I see incidents which have everyone asking, "What was he thinking?"


    I hope this series has been interesting and informative. I'll look forward to seeing you at the track.

    Good feedback... I have a weird problem.. Sometimes I get so relaxed racing that I lose focus. How to keep the edge up? Faster car?

  19. #39
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    awesome stuff! thank you!
    Chris Rallo "the kid"
    -- "wrenching and racing" -- "will race for food!" -- "Onward and Upward"

    Independent Motorsports Group: Cars * Competition * Camaraderie

  20. #40
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    Spinetti - Remind yourself this can kill you when you start to mentally drift - that will grab your attention. Focus on each and every corner, think about each shift, prepare and move your body with precision and purpose.
    BenSpeed
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    BigSpeed Racing
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