Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23

Thread: Garage Floor Paint

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rockville, MD
    Posts
    274

    Default Garage Floor Paint

    I'm completing a new 1200 square foot garage and want to paint the floor to keep down cement dust and avoid oil soaking into the concrete. Any recommendations on the most durable two-stage epoxy paint?
    Regards,
    Chuck

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Sterling, VA
    Posts
    734

    Default

    My dad did his 26'x57' garage in U-Coat-It or U-Coat. Can't remember.

    Stay away from the flecks. They make dropped screws and stuff ahrd to see. Or at least be light with the flecks. Make sure you put the sand in it too cause that stuffs slick when wet. If it's part of the basement or something like that you will need a dehumidifier also cause the moisture in the air sits on top making the floor always seem wet.
    Spanky | #73 ITA 1990 Honda Civic WDCR SOLD | #73 ITA 1995 Honda Civic WDCR in progress |
    ** Sponsored by J&L Automotive (703) 327-5239 | Engineered Services, Inc. http://www.EngineeredServices.com **

    Isaac Rules | Build Pictures

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    MD, US
    Posts
    1,333

    Default

    the 2 part (not stages) epoxy will probably last you the longest. I agree with rob, avoid the flecks, just get some sand and work that in when the floor is painted.
    --
    James Brostek
    MARRS #28 ITB Golf
    PMF Motorsports
    Racing and OEM parts from Bildon Motorsport, Hoosier Tires from Radial Tires

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    384

    Default

    Do the ones you guys recommend hold up to the abuse of a garage that actually gets used for a garage (rolling a jack across the floor, dropping tools, sparks from cutting, etc.. ) as apposed to a garage that the family car gets parked in and the most abuse it sees is a dropped bag of groceries.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lagrangeville, NY
    Posts
    691

    Default

    Along with building the car I have been finishing my garage. I have been lurking at garage journal.com

    Here is the link to flooring. After all is said and done, when it is time to put flooring down in my garage, it will be VCT.

    http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=20
    Chris Raffaelli
    24ITA

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    newington, ct
    Posts
    4,182

    Default

    Chris, you're going to make us work that much? I too would like to re-paint my garage floor. The product I used didn't hold up to gas that spilled on the floor. What is VCT?
    Dave Gran
    Real Roads, Real Car Guys – Real World Road Tests
    Go Ahead - Take the Wheel's Free Guide to Racing

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Raleigh NC
    Posts
    3,682

    Thumbs up

    I've used this system with extremely good results:

    www.tnemec.com

    More specifically:
    http://www.tnemec.com/stratashield/

    The latest project was coating my new 850 sq ft garage floor and Jeff Young helped extensively with the project.

    I used 201 Primer, 280 middle coat, followed by a 291 top coat. No flakes, avoid those in any system you choose. I've done two garage with this stuff and helped with one hangar, results have always been very good.

    It isn't cheap but it is among the best available. Materials to do my garage, not counting the acid, buckets, rollers, and so on was right at $800, or about $1 per square foot.

    I strongly feel in epoxy floor coatings 1) you get what you pay for and 2) initial prep is all important.

    Use the website to get your local rep then call them to discuss needs. Tnemec will ship directly to your house via Fed Ex freight (a big deal, Epoxy is heavy).

    Ron
    Last edited by Ron Earp; 07-17-2008 at 03:59 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lagrangeville, NY
    Posts
    691

    Default

    LOL, from what I gather from the ‘experts’ on that site, in order of begin best:

    1. Stained
    2. Epoxy by professional
    3. Sealed concrete
    4. Nothing at all, leave bar concrete
    5. VCT
    6. Epoxy by DIY
    7. Paint
    8. Ceramic Tile.

    VCT – Vinyl Composition Tile. You can see it at Home Depot. It is a thicker gauge, more dense version of the peel and pick tiles glue with an industrial type trowel on glue. It is what you walk on when you goto Walmart or similar.

    The reason I am going to use it:
    Most of the stains and epoxies really need a newer clean slab or you will get peeling. My slab is 40+years old, stained and pitted. I can just power wash my floor, flash patch the pits and start laying tile. Once you start chipping the finish epoxy by dropping your impact wrench on it, you don’t have a good way to repair it without it looking like a repair. While the tiles are not ‘the best’ method, I can install it myself, I can get them whenever I want, and I can replace a tile without it looking like I replaced a tile.
    Chris Raffaelli
    24ITA

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    raleigh, nc, usa
    Posts
    5,251

    Default

    After helping Ron with his, all I can say is that DIY Epoxy is not hard, just time consuming. $4k for a professional install is a joke; take a weekend, do it right and you will be fine.

    As far as your old floor goes, you may just need to hit it with the etching acid a few more times than we did, but I suspect you can get a clean, etched surface just like we did.

    Highly recommend DIY Epoxy after doing it. Not hard, and the final product is very nice.

    By the way, Ron has Epoxy in his existing garage, which was stained when he intsalled it, and it has not chipped in 3 years.

    Good stuff.
    NC Region
    1980 ITS Triumph TR8

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Concord, NH 03301
    Posts
    700

    Default

    I'll be curious to see how the VCT works. I've seen a lot of commercial buildings built and VCT doesn't often get used where there are high point loads. Jack stands count as a high point load. They can be replaced as needed and re-polished when the get worn so I can see the advantage. Flashing in pits & grade changes is highly important, the stuff is not at all flexible, if there is an edge of some sort under it, you'll get a tear or crease. Not sure how it holds up to hot sparks landing on it. If you let it get wet a lot, the glue will let go as almost all of the adhesives are water based.

    VCT has some advantages, but in an industrial application for new buildings epoxy is what the architects specify.

    Nothing is really going to hold up to lots of abraision, high point loads or really hot stuff (welding/cutting) landing on it. If its a welding shop there is just no hope.


    BTW what kind of "garage" gets ceramic tile on the floor? Showroom maybe, not a garage.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    alexandria, va
    Posts
    850

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JeffYoung View Post
    After helping Ron with his, all I can say is that DIY Epoxy is not hard, just time consuming. $4k for a professional install is a joke; take a weekend, do it right and you will be fine.

    As far as your old floor goes, you may just need to hit it with the etching acid a few more times than we did, but I suspect you can get a clean, etched surface just like we did.

    Highly recommend DIY Epoxy after doing it. Not hard, and the final product is very nice.

    By the way, Ron has Epoxy in his existing garage, which was stained when he intsalled it, and it has not chipped in 3 years.

    Good stuff.
    i agree jeff. especially if he is starting with a new floor. i used rustoleum epoxy in my shop when new 6 years ago. stuff has held up beautifully. shop is very active...built 4 race cars in it and maintained them all.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lagrangeville, NY
    Posts
    691

    Default

    <-------- architect that specifies expoxy on new slabs all the time.....when it is someone else's wallet.

    The point loads I think can be handled with a plywood under th stand. The welding is handled with a blanket. The replacement of the tile is about 3 minutes to heat it with a torch and pop it out. Seems real easy to me. On that site there are several building shops showing pics of all the flooring materials. All have there draw backs. I think it really comes down to budget and ease or repair. I was set on the Rustoleum Epoxy, then decide on VCT. I was concerned that, fast forward a few years...will I need to grind the old expoxy off to redo the floor? I know I can just reheat the tiles and activeate the glue again for new tiles.


    Quote Originally Posted by MMiskoe View Post
    I'll be curious to see how the VCT works. I've seen a lot of commercial buildings built and VCT doesn't often get used where there are high point loads. Jack stands count as a high point load. They can be replaced as needed and re-polished when the get worn so I can see the advantage. Flashing in pits & grade changes is highly important, the stuff is not at all flexible, if there is an edge of some sort under it, you'll get a tear or crease. Not sure how it holds up to hot sparks landing on it. If you let it get wet a lot, the glue will let go as almost all of the adhesives are water based.

    VCT has some advantages, but in an industrial application for new buildings epoxy is what the architects specify.

    Nothing is really going to hold up to lots of abraision, high point loads or really hot stuff (welding/cutting) landing on it. If its a welding shop there is just no hope.


    BTW what kind of "garage" gets ceramic tile on the floor? Showroom maybe, not a garage.
    Chris Raffaelli
    24ITA

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Raleigh NC
    Posts
    3,682

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by raffaelli View Post
    .will I need to grind the old expoxy off to redo the floor? I know I can just reheat the tiles and activeate the glue again for new tiles.
    You're set on tiles and that is fine, do it up. It'll work, I've seen tile installs hold up fine.

    With the epoxy you do not need to grind it off and reapply. If the surface is properly prepped and applied all you'll ever need to do is spot repairs if you damage it, very similar to tile replacement in complexity.

    R

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lagrangeville, NY
    Posts
    691

    Default

    um, maybe I will consider it again. - - but right now, money goes into the car!
    Chris Raffaelli
    24ITA

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    La Habra, CA
    Posts
    144

    Default

    Having done the garage floor coating thing in my shop, I'll never do it again. At most I'll have the concrete cleaned, acid etched, stained, and sealed. I'll also stay away from any rough texture or sand. It makes mopping and cleaning up the floor a pain. A sealed, smooth surface works the best.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Black Rock, Ct
    Posts
    9,594

    Default

    Tiles. heavy duty ceramic tiles. like Ferrari does it!

    kidding. Well, I'm not, but I am.

    Thats the issue, I have decided, over the years, is that our desires make teh choice tough, because our uses are so diverse.

    We all want the slick clean sexy look. But we all weld, cut, drop quarts of oil and gear lube on the floor, and don't buff/wax/polish/lick it like we could/should.

    I have VCT tiles. Well, they were cheap, pretty easy to do, and they're not bad to lie on.

    But. Honestly, all the plywood bases for the jacks and stands and welding blankets and pans and so on gets old, and there are messes that are unavoidable. And...you really must need to get the polishes/waxes/treatments they sell, and the machine like the janitor used in school to make it last. Mine looks like crap after a couple years. Dark with oil stains (even though I try Clorox and Mr Clean and Brake Clean to remove them), and cracked from jacking.

    I went with VCT because the paint I put down, after 4 DAYS of cleaning and scraping and acid etching lifted like a sail plane in a hurricane. My garage is 100 years old, the slab is probably thin, and it seems to have lots of moisture emanating from it. Certain areas took over a week to dry (using the paint manufacturers testing method), even though it had fans and A/C units blowing on it. I came to the conclusion that maybe the $1000 super duper paints might be better, but the risk was too high, and went with VCT.

    So, if you do VCT, make sure you budget for the care and feeding and the needed tools to do that efficiently.
    Jake Gulick


    CarriageHouse Motorsports
    for sale: 2003 Audi A4 Quattro, clean, serviced, dark green, auto, sunroof, tan leather with 75K miles.
    IT-7 #57 RX-7 race car
    Porsche 1973 911E street/fun car
    BMW 2003 M3 cab, sun car.
    GMC Sierra Tow Vehicle
    New England Region
    lateapex911(at)gmail(dot)com


  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Staying off the walls
    Posts
    1,049

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lateapex911 View Post
    My garage is 100 years old...
    At 100 years old, that's not a garage, that's a carriage house. Cool.
    Tom Sprecher

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    hampden,ma.usa
    Posts
    3,082

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tom_sprecher View Post
    At 100 years old, that's not a garage, that's a carriage house. Cool.
    Ding ding ding.

    but it sounds sexier than it is :cool:
    dick patullo
    ner scca IT7 Rx7

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rockville, MD
    Posts
    274

    Default

    Damn, when I started this thread I only had 4 cars in the garage and thought I could do half, then move the cars and do the other half. Now I have six cars and a disassembled engine. Kinda fills it up except for the beer cooler.
    Thanks for all the good feedback - I did all the associated reading and considered everyone's advice. I was vacillating between VCT and 2 part epoxy until Jake checked in. The concrete is clean and above grade so it's dry. I'll be doing the 2 part as soon as I can farm out a few cars.
    Regards,
    Chuck

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Raleigh NC
    Posts
    3,682

    Post

    Hey Chuck,

    Get the cars out of the garage, and prep. Then, prep some more. And you'll be happy I think.

    The epoxy stuff is good - if you pay for it. I'm a chemist by trade and I can't tell you what brand is best (sorry, not my specialty but if it is "one part", then I can tell you it isn't worth a damn). All I know is I took the advice of someone I trusted, paid $$$ for some "good stuff", and having used it three times it has worked extremely well. I'm happy.

    If you end up using Tnemec I can help with some advice and some notes I recovered from my 2005 application. Figure about $1 per sq foot if you do it with the help of your racer buddies and it'll take about three to four days - but you'll have a solid surface and it is repairable.

    R

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •