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View Full Version : Is this brake rotor legal in STO?



titanium
12-19-2011, 12:20 AM
I came across the Turbine Brake Rotors at the PRI show.
(My 1994 STO Mustang runs the 14in rotors from a 2007-up GT500)
http://www.turbinebrakerotors.com/steel_rotors.php
The STO rules say a 'ferrous' rotor is required and 1 or 2-piece.
(The rep at the show says a magnet will stick to the friction surface)

Matt93SE
12-19-2011, 09:06 AM
I'd be curious how those perform. As for legality, I'd say it's a gray area, but technically it would be legal as the rules are worded-- a magnetic would stick thus they're ferrous.

I would also be curious what a set of regular 2-pc rotors with a lightweight disc weigh in your size-- the 12" rotors I have from Coleman are under 12lb each. You may be splitting hairs at that point on weight & performance..

Greg Amy
12-19-2011, 09:15 AM
From the GCR:

"Ferrous An alloy containing more than 50% iron."

titanium
12-19-2011, 12:49 PM
Now for the part I left out.
The "center" of the rotor, (where the cooling vanes are), is not made of the same material as the friction surface (stainless steel) or the hub (aluminum).

Still legal????:shrug:

Greg Amy
12-19-2011, 12:55 PM
A good question. I suggest that aluminum rotors hats are intended to be allowed, but that's not what the rules say. Submit a request for correction at the below link and we'll pass it through the CRB for clarification.

http://www.crbscca.com/

Matt93SE
12-19-2011, 06:48 PM
He's not questioning the hats.. He's questioning the legality of a stainless steel friction surface with a (ceramic?) insert between friction surfaces.
Strange concept, but if it works.....

Greg Amy
12-19-2011, 09:02 PM
Send in a request for clarification, with details.

I suggest that as long as the friction surface is "ferrous", then the rest can be pea soup. But mine is not the official opinion/position.

GA

GKR_17
12-20-2011, 03:57 PM
For what it's worth, stainless steel is lousy as a friction surface.

Matt Rowe
12-20-2011, 04:33 PM
Ceramic are awful conductors of heat, they are brittle and the coefficient of thermal expansion is usually an order of magnitude lower than your average metal. Why in the world anyone would want to create a metal/ceramic composite rotor is beyond me.

When one of the claimed benefits is "Improved appearance: eliminates unsightly rusted rotors" I can guess what market they are targeting and it isn't the racing crowd.

JS154
12-20-2011, 09:49 PM
I suspect the intent of the rule was to not allow carbon brake discs or carbon-ceramic brake discs.

(What if someone shows up to STO in a 911 GT2 with stock carbon-ceramic brakes?)

CRallo
12-20-2011, 10:19 PM
I suspect the intent of the rule was to not allow carbon brake discs or carbon-ceramic brake discs.

(What if someone shows up to STO in a 911 GT2 with stock carbon-ceramic brakes?)

I agree on the first part.

I regards to the 911 GT2, is it classified? Any notes on the specline?