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RX Ron
08-01-2002, 03:27 PM
Now that I have a wonderful cheap floor jack. Can anyone tell me where to find a wonderful cheap radio for my car?

Thanks

balz
08-02-2002, 08:47 PM
My recommendation is that you look at the Kenwood GRMS 15 chanel radio. I have been able to find them for 183 a piece. They are 2 watts, upgradable to 4. The part number is a 3102K2 I believe.

These are MIL SPEC radios, not some hookie family radio.

They are FULLY programmable and I love mine. You will have to shop around but you can find some really good deals on them.

Best regards,

Frank
#67 IT-7
www.balz.myip.org (http://www.balz.myip.org)

lateapex911
08-04-2002, 10:53 PM
Any source suggestion on those Kenwoods?

------------------
Jake Gulick
ITA 57 RX-7
Northeast Region
[email protected]

balz
08-05-2002, 03:21 PM
I would do a search online (google/yahoo search) to see if you get any hits. If you don't, then I would try racing communications here in Atlanta. You'll pay more for them, but IMHO they are some of the best on the market for the money.



------------------
Balz
#67 IT-7
www.balz.myip.org
"I live my life one Apex (seal) at a time"

Dave Burchfield
08-05-2002, 03:46 PM
One needs to remember that there is a difference between GMRS and FRS radios. FRS(Family Radio Service) radios will not do the job for car to pit communications.

In looking for GMRS radios, I would suggest Kenwood, Icom, and Yaesu as the primary brands. They all serve the commercial and ameteur service. I have used all three in the amateur service for the last 25 years and been pleased with the value and performance of them. I am currently using an Icom 4AT in the car and either a Yaesu FT815 or Yaesu FT50 as a pit radio. I like the FT50 because it is a dual band radio that allows one to go from UHF for car communication to high band to monitor race control/stewards. I would add that my crew chief and I are both licensed amateur operators. It is a pretty simple test that anyone can pass.....a good winter project.

My choice for suppliers is R & L Electronics in Hamilton, Ohio. (800)221-7735.

db

Edwin Robinson
08-05-2002, 08:00 PM
Originally posted by Dave Burchfield:
One needs to remember that there is a difference between GMRS and FRS radios. FRS(Family Radio Service) radios will not do the job for car to pit communications.

In looking for GMRS radios, I would suggest Kenwood, Icom, and Yaesu as the primary brands. They all serve the commercial and ameteur service. I have used all three in the amateur service for the last 25 years and been pleased with the value and performance of them. I am currently using an Icom 4AT in the car and either a Yaesu FT815 or Yaesu FT50 as a pit radio. I like the FT50 because it is a dual band radio that allows one to go from UHF for car communication to high band to monitor race control/stewards. I would add that my crew chief and I are both licensed amateur operators. It is a pretty simple test that anyone can pass.....a good winter project.

My choice for suppliers is R & L Electronics in Hamilton, Ohio. (800)221-7735.

db

I use the Yaesu FT50 RD's - Nice handheld unit, and you can get an adapter that will convert to *most* in car wiring harnesses.
The 'dual watch' feature can even let the driver! listen to the race stewards. A nice feature - like for three years ago when I crashed at The Glen - I actually heard the corner workers telling me that I had an accident.... ;^)

dominojd
08-14-2002, 06:47 AM
Found this on e-bay it might help
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/ebayISAP...1368497&r=0&t=0 (http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/ebayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1851368497&r=0&t=0)

RX Ron
08-26-2002, 10:42 AM
Thanks to everyone who posted and gave me ideas. One of the guys at work suggested that since weekend minutes are free from some phone companies, why don't I just use two telephones and call each other? I am sure you guys would know if this is a possibility or not. Thank you

itbescort
09-03-2002, 08:28 AM
Originally posted by Edwin Robinson:
I use the Yaesu FT50 RD's - Nice handheld unit, and you can get an adapter that will convert to *most* in car wiring harnesses.
The 'dual watch' feature can even let the driver! listen to the race stewards. A nice feature - like for three years ago when I crashed at The Glen - I actually heard the corner workers telling me that I had an accident.... ;^)



Just wondering what parts you added to your FT 50. I also have one and I tried to just use the speaker mic. I took it apart and mounted the mic in the helmet and wired the PTT up to a relay. Way to much back ground noise! http://Forums.ImprovedTouring.com/it/eek.gif I am assuming it is because the mic is not noise canceling.

Fleetcare
09-04-2002, 05:15 PM
I was @ road atl this weekend. Somehow we couldnt find the convertor for the motorola radio to work with the cars antenna. Anyways we just used the stock radio antenna ( 8" long ) and we could hear each other all around the track.. HELL YE! I was very impressed.

Edwin Robinson
09-04-2002, 06:31 PM
Originally posted by itbescort:
Just wondering what parts you added to your FT 50. I also have one and I tried to just use the speaker mic. I took it apart and mounted the mic in the helmet and wired the PTT up to a relay. Way to much back ground noise! http://Forums.ImprovedTouring.com/it/eek.gif I am assuming it is because the mic is not noise canceling.

There's a connector that yaesu sells that goes from the single connector to a two-pin connector. It kind of plugs into the external hookup and clips onto the antenna shaft. Then- I had my radio guy make a little pigtail that goes from that to the actual car wiring harness. Most car wiring harnesses have a connector with a 3-pin plug just before the connector for the radio connection- I have multiple ones of these - I have one that fits the Yaesu's and one that fits the Motorola SP's This way I can swap stuff out easy. (radio types)
Unfortunately, I don't know of anything that will approach the quality of an in-car harness with the associated helmet wiring- so that's what I have. However, the radios that most companies sell seem to be limiting (few channels and somewhat pricey) That's why I went with the Yaesu's - They are MilSpec and you can set them to an almost infinite number of frequencies.
Of course, you should be licensed to transmit on these frequencies.... ;^)

~E.




[This message has been edited by Edwin Robinson (edited September 04, 2002).]

itbescort
09-05-2002, 06:20 AM
[quote]Originally posted by Edwin Robinson:
[B] There's a connector that yaesu sells that goes from the single connector to a two-pin connector. It kind of plugs into the external hookup and clips onto the antenna shaft. Then- I had my radio guy make a little pigtail that goes from that to the actual car wiring harness. Most car wiring harnesses have a connector with a 3-pin plug just before the connector for the radio connection- I have multiple ones of these - I have one that fits the Yaesu's and one that fits the Motorola SP's This way I can swap stuff out easy. (radio types)
Unfortunately, I don't know of anything that will approach the quality of an in-car harness with the associated helmet wiring- so that's what I have. However, the radios that most companies sell seem to be limiting (few channels and somewhat pricey) That's why I went with the Yaesu's - They are MilSpec and you can set them to an almost infinite number of frequencies.
Of course, you should be licensed to transmit on these frequencies.... ;^)

~E.
Thanks Ed, I have and use the connector that you talk about. I also have a few different types of radios that I use. Some need the adapter and some plug right in. What type of in car harness do you have and will your radio guy customize it for any one else?
And yes I have my ham license.
Thanks
Tim

Edwin Robinson
09-05-2002, 01:53 PM
Originally posted by itbescort:
[quote]Originally posted by Edwin Robinson:
[B] There's a connector that yaesu sells that goes from the single connector to a two-pin connector. It kind of plugs into the external hookup and clips onto the antenna shaft. Then- I had my radio guy make a little pigtail that goes from that to the actual car wiring harness. Most car wiring harnesses have a connector with a 3-pin plug just before the connector for the radio connection- I have multiple ones of these - I have one that fits the Yaesu's and one that fits the Motorola SP's This way I can swap stuff out easy. (radio types)
Unfortunately, I don't know of anything that will approach the quality of an in-car harness with the associated helmet wiring- so that's what I have. However, the radios that most companies sell seem to be limiting (few channels and somewhat pricey) That's why I went with the Yaesu's - They are MilSpec and you can set them to an almost infinite number of frequencies.
Of course, you should be licensed to transmit on these frequencies.... ;^)

~E.
Thanks Ed, I have and use the connector that you talk about. I also have a few different types of radios that I use. Some need the adapter and some plug right in. What type of in car harness do you have and will your radio guy customize it for any one else?
And yes I have my ham license.
Thanks
Tim


I think the harness was a Racing Radios harness... many are very similar- make sure it has the small pigtail connector for the adapter to radio junction. I got one without this- and it was nearly impossible to fit to different radio models.... Also- those PTT switches- I've had 2 of them go bad- I'd recommend getting a spare- it'll fail at the least opportune time.

~E.

DoorDoctor
09-08-2002, 04:51 PM
Check with the local dirt track racers
Locally you can get some great deals as they can't use radios per a rules change.

Greg Gauper
09-10-2002, 08:56 AM
I know this has been discussed before but...

Last week-end at Mid-Ohio I tried something new. My wife and I have a set of those cheap Motorola Walk-About radios for when we do corner working at the track. The newer models have very good range, but the earphone jack isn't a standard 1/8" jack. We also have an older unit did have the smaller jack.

I went to Radio Shack and bought a set of 'privacy' headphones that are designed to wear on an airplane. These have built in ear plugs but the plugs were pretty cheap and didn't fit snug, plus they didn't block out the loud noises. So I took the old tips off, made new tips out of heat shrink tubing that were 1/4" longer. I put a set of EAR earplugs in the freezer to harden and then drilled them out to fit the new headphone tubes. They worked perfectly! I could hear clear as a bell inside the car, in traffic, no problem. My wife used the new model with the better range and more power for transmitting. I could hear her on the whole front straight, as far as turn 15 (I could her call out Green Flag at the start when I was in the middle of traffic @ corner 15) and about halfway between 1 & 2. The radio is small enough to clip on to my chest pocket and doesn't get in the way of my sholder belts, and didn't interfer with my steering motions, especially at a busy track like Mid-Ohio.

Downside? They certainly do not have the range of good racing radios and I wasn't set up to talk back. But that was okay with me. All I was interested in was to prevent my wife from having to cross the pit lane to show me my board. The interesting thing was how much less of a distraction it was to not have to take my eyes off the road and scan for my pit board. My wife was concerned that she might distract me by talking to much, but I assured her it was no distraction, and it was much easier to focus on driving.

I normally like as little information as possible from my crew while I'm driving so for me, the lack of range is not a problem.

In qualifying, I only car about my lap times and time remaining. In the race I only car about laps remaining, position, and differential.

I have always used a pit board in my 17 years of racing. I will never go back using a pit board again!!! Another advantage, the pit board (dry marker) didn't work in the rain. This is no longer a problem.

Total cost....$15 for the headphones (already had the radios).

I will buy a $3 adapter to convert from stereo to mono since the headphones were stereo but the radio was mono and I could only hear out of one ear.

Some day I might invest in a good set of racing radios, but for now, this if perfectly adequate.

Dave Burchfield
09-11-2002, 08:08 AM
Tim and Ed,

Keep your eyes open at the Hamfests for a Comet ear microphone. I use one with an Icom 4AT in the car. The really good thing about it is that the microphone fits in the ear, is completely noise eleminating, and quite comfortable. I am not certain if they are being manufactured any more but they can be found on flea markets.

db

hatchback
10-18-2005, 03:51 PM
I'd like to resurrect this thread.... At my last SCCA race, there were two red flags with ambulences all over the track and it upset my wife greatly because it was nearly an hour before she was sure that I was okay. So to get back on the track I need an inexpensive two-way radio to communicate with my wife during race track emergencies, mostly to let her know that I am okay if a red flag comes out. It would be nice if she could relay race information to me (eg., distance to leaders, when the green flag drops) but its not critical. Even the cheapest "race radio systems" are circa $600, but I see that you can get 2 Motorola SX700's with 7 GMRS channels and 7 FRS channels and a claimed 12 mile range for only $80. Add in an in-helmet microphone for $80 and we're set. What's the downside of such a system?

RSTPerformance
10-18-2005, 04:59 PM
We now use those talk about radio's with the privacy channels and the mic/speaker dual jacks...

VERY few of the "talk bout" radios available have the 2 jack plug that is required to have both an earpiece and a microphone to attach to it. Ours are made by midland: (we also have an old motarola but we can not find any new ones with the dual jack setup).

http://www.midlandradio.com/comersus/store...?idProduct=5450 (http://www.midlandradio.com/comersus/store/comersus_viewItem.asp?idProduct=5450)

We do have "real" car wiring harnesses that cost a bundle, that were hooked up to "real" radios at one point. But we did find that these radios are much much cheaper ($70 for 2 vs $200 + for 1). Not to mention the cost, but the ability to have peaople scattered all around the track (every crew person) for a reasonable price. Everyone on the team has one available to them, and we use them all day at the track when wondering around the padock, but when it comes to race time, only the crew chief is allowed to talk (well and the driver). The radios have been used at Mid-Ohio, Watkins Glen (long course), and NHIS and have worked all the way around the track perfectly without any problems (provided the battery is charged up). This weekend we will be testing it out at Lime Rock and I do not see us having any problems. One thing to note, is that you need to turn on the radio after everything is pluged in... for some reason we found that it doesn't always work if you plug in the headsets after the power is turned on.

PS: when reviewing the website I see a full face helmet wiring set, including the push button for 49.95... hummm I see a new setup...

1 crew (1 Radio and Behind the Head Boom Mic) and 1 driver (1 radio and Helmet Headset) all for about $150.00.